Blog Archives

Remembering the fallen

Local services marking Anzac Day this year include special recognition of the Battle of Bullecourt at the Breakfast Point War Memorial.

Of the many First World War battles those at Bullecourt in northern France were amongst the most horrific. Four experienced Australian divisions of I ANZAC Corps were part of the British 5th Army under Sir Hubert Gough. The general wanted to attack at Bullecourt to support an important offensive by the adjoining British 3rd Army to the north and the French Army further to the south. However poor planning resulted in heavy losses. The first attack launched at Bullecourt on 11 April 1917 was a disaster. Despite this a further attack across the same ground was ordered for 3 May. The Australians broke into and took part of the Hindenburg Line but no important strategic advantage was ever gained. In the two battles the AIF lost 10,000 men.

The Breakfast Point War Memorial lists the names of eight local men who died at Bullecourt.

The photograph shows the unveiling of the Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) war memorial by Sir Dudley de Chair, Governor of NSW in 1926. It has since been replaced by the Breakfast Point memorial.

More than just a name

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City of Canada Bay Mayor Angelo Tsirekas today presented certificates to year five and six students from Five Dock Public School who participated in the ‘More than just a name’ project.

The six-week project involved 90 students, researching 27 soldiers who worked at the Australian Gas Light Company, Mortlake. The students used iMovie on the City of Canada Bay Libraries’ portable multimedia studio to create a two-minute video commemorating the lives of the soldiers.

‘It is important that our future generations remember the sacrifice these soldiers took for our country and educating our youth is one way to ensure their memory lives on,’ Mayor Angelo Tsirekas said.

Students from Concord Public School and Concord High School are also participating in the project.

The ‘More than just a name’ student videos can be seen on youtube.

Breakfast Point War Memorial

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During the First World War 340 Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) workers enlisted to serve from a workforce of 3,000 employees at the Mortlake Gasworks and in metropolitan Sydney.

In 1926 a memorial tablet to the 45 AGL employees who died in the First World War was unveiled at the work gates on Tennyson Road, Mortlake. Sadly, during the redevelopment of the AGL site as Breakfast Point the tablet was stolen. However a new war memorial was created to commemorate their service.

Breakfast Point resident Greg Maunsell has researched the names of those listed on the Breakfast Point War memorial to create a web page in their honour. Greg will share the colourful and moving stories of the men associated with the Mortlake Gasworks who perished in the First World War at Concord Library on Tuesday, 15 April at 1pm.

Trace your family history

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City of Canada Bay Library Service provides access to two important databases for people wishing to trace their family history, Ancestry and Find My Past.

To coincide with Family History Month, Heather Garnsey of the Society of Australian Genealogists will be giving an informative talk to help family history researchers. The talk is aimed at current users of Ancestry and Find My Past who would like to enhance their search skills and use these databases to greater effect.

The talk will be held at Concord Library on Tuesday, 27 August 2013.

The photograph shows John and Amanda Jane Smith with their children at Mortlake. Behind their home looms one of the AGL (Australian Gas Light Company) Gas Storage Tanks. John Smith was an engineer, born in Kent, who came to Australia to install a new stoking machine at AGL. After serving 15 years with AGL he operated the Petersham Hotel for a period before returning to AGL where he worked until his death in 1927.

The view from above

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Canada Bay Connections includes many aerial photographs which provide a fascinating perspective of our area.

The photograph above shows the Parramatta River looking towards Cabarita and Mortlake. The huge gas storage tanks of the Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) can be seen dominating the landscape.

AGL purchased 32 hectares of land at Mortlake in 1884 and commenced gas production two years later. Following the closure of the gasworks in 1990 the site has been redeveloped for medium-density housing and today is known as Breakfast Point.

The photograph is by Milton Kent (1888-1965) who specialised in oblique aerial photography over Sydney in the 1930s. The image is believed to have been taken in 1939.